Close

Aug 4, 2022

How to Pass On Your Passwords After You Die

Do you plan to live forever? No? I didn’t think so.

Have you thought about creating a secure credential inheritance plan for your loved ones? That is, once you are gone, how will your heirs be able to log into your bank accounts, stock broker account, crypto currency wallets, email, social media accounts (somebody has to inform the rest of the world of your demise and that certainly won’t be you!), utility bills, mortgage account, Netflix and other streaming service subscriptions, or any of the other password-protected accounts that are so common these days.

I am sure there are plenty of ways of making sure your heirs have access to all your accounts, including passwords. However, probably the easiest method is to provide them with access to your password manager. (You DO have a password manager, right?)

Giving a trusted person access to your password manager vault could be the most useful legacy you leave behind. Talk about your online account inheritance plan with the people who will receive your passwords when you die. Let them know which password manager you use, and leave written instructions for accessing your digital vault.

If you do not yet gave a password manager, you might waant to consider some of these:

Bitwardenhttps://bitwarden.com/FREE for personal use, modest fees for families, “teams,” or for corporate use. Also, Bitwarden Send is a feature that allows all users to transmit data directly to others, while maintaining end-to-end encrypted security and limiting exposure. Versions available for a web browser (any sort of computer) plus native versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, Chromebook, Apple iOS, or Android. There is also a command line option that you can run by itself or embed it into scripts. This is the password manager I use and I haven’t yet found any other password manager that tempts me to switch.

1Passwordhttps://1password.com/ – $4.99 U.S. for access by a family of five. Versions available for a web browser (any sort of computer) plus native versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, Apple iOS, or Android.

LastPasshttps://www.lastpass.com/ – Offers 30-days free access, $3 U.S. after that. Each user gets their own personalized account with LastPass Families.

Dashlanehttps://www.dashlane.com/FREE although limited to use on only one device, additional devices cost money, families pay $8.99/month for use by all family members, an extension for the Chrome web browser.

Keeperhttps://www.keepersecurity.com/ – Available for Windows, Macintosh, Android, and Apple iOS – primarily aimed at use by corporations, FREE for use by one person, $4.99 for use by families.

NordPasshttps://nordpass.com/ – Set up emergency contacts so if unexpected happens, someone you trust could access your passwords.

RoboFormhttps://www.roboform.com/ – for Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android plus web browsers (on any sort of computer).

Finally, talk about your online account inheritance plan with the people who will receive your passwords when you die. Let them know which password manager you use, and leave written instructions for accessing your digital vault.

Generated by Feedzy