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Colonial Study Group

CONTACT INFO

Karen Wente

For more information on the Colonial Group, please contact the group leaders Ken Horne & Karen Wente at email: colonial@lcgsco.org

COLONIAL STUDY GROUP GOALS

The Colonial Group actively works on genealogical research of the Colonial Period, from early immigration in the 1600’s until our country became the United States of America. We address how to overcome challenges of tracing colonial ancestors, colonial history & social timelines, identifying resources, learning history of the original 13 colonies and their towns, look at immigration and migration, and address issues such as: Why our Ancestor and/or their family might have suddenly disappeared? Where and why did they go? How did they get there? And, how do I find people when there are no records? The Colonial Group is educational, helpful and interesting.

MEMBERSHIP

New members can apply for membership at: LCGS Membership. Dues are only $20/yr for a single person. It is encouraged that you become a member of the society and to also participate in the BISG; but you are welcome to attend a few meetings prior to making a decision to join. Normal attendance is about thirty members.

Membership includes a subscription to the LCGS monthly newsletter and to participate in their monthly meetings. Details about LCGS monthly meetings and other events can be found on the LCGS Website.

Larimer County Genealogical Society P. O. Box 270737 Fort Collins, Colorado 80527-0737

MEETINGS

This group presently meets online on ZOOM, the second Monday of each month, from 10-Noon.

The Colonial Group actively works on genealogical research of the Colonial Period from early immigration in the 1600’s until our country became the United States. We address how to overcome challenges of tracing colonial ancestors, colonial history & social timelines, identifying resources, learning history of the original 13 colonies and their towns, look at immigration and migration, and address issues such as: Why our ancestors and/or their family might have suddenly disappeared? Where and why did they go? How did they get there? And,how do I find people when there are no records? The Colonial Group is educational, helpful, and interesting.

Our next meeting: June 14th from 10-Noon on Zoom
Colonial Group will focus on new skills for researching colonial ancestors and our ‘LCGS Colonial Challenge.’ If you want to get an idea of what our LCGS Colonial Challenge will look like, go to YouTube and watch the ‘WikiTree Challenge’. Watch their videos as they are very informational. Then join our Colonial Group to set up our own Colonial Challenge. The purpose of our Challenge is to help break down brick walls, learn about colonial research methods, make our research more accurate and complete, and have fun.

For more information on our Colonial Group, please contact:

Ken Horne: klhorne@comcast.net
Karen Wente: karenwestwente@gmail.com

GREAT COLONIAL PERIOD RESOURCES

Publications

Anglo-Americans in Spanish Archives by Lawrence H. Feldman

Denizations and Naturalizations in the British Colonies in America, 1607-1775 by Lloyd deWitt Bockstruck

Dutch Colonists in the Americas, 1615-1815, by David Dobson

Genealogists Handbook for New England Research, 5th Edition by Leclerc, Michael J., Published by the New England Historic Society, 2012

Genealogical Notes, or Contributions to the Family History of some of the First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts by Goodwin, Nathaniel, Published by Heritage Books, 2000

Hidden Sources: Family History in Unlikely Places, by Laura Szucs Pfiffe

New Englanders in the 1600s: A guide to Genealogical Research Published Between 1980-2010H by ollick, Martin Edward Hollick, Published by NEGS in 2012. Available in book form

Periodicals for finding Colonial Ancestors:
● The New England Historical and Genealogical Register
● New York Biological & Genealogical Record
● The Mayflower Descendant
● The American Genealogist (TAG) (Volumes 1 to 82 are available online to NEHGS members)

A Guide to Published Genealogical Records, edited by Kory L. Meyerink

Reading Early American Handwriting by Kip Sperry

The Expansion of New England: The Spread of New England Settlement and Institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865 (book available FREE on Google Books).

The Great Migration Directory: Immigrants to America1620-1640 (This book lists the names of all known to have come to New England during the Great Migration period, 1620-1640) by Anderson, Robert Charles, Published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.

The Mayflower Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth, 1620 by Anderson, Robert Charles, Published by New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2020.

The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony 1620-1633 by Anderson, Robert Charles, Published by New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006.

The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy by Val D. Greenwood.

Tracing Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes by Rachel Mills Lennon.

Online Resources

A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England

Ancestor Bibliography Register

Ancestry.com (includes card catalog, family trees & DNA all a great help)

Chronicling America (colonial newspapers)

Daughters of the American Revolution – DAR Visit their Genealogical Research System (GRS)

Digital Public Library of America (lots of family histories & county histories)

Family Search Website (especially their card catalog)

Find My Past Website has PERSI (extensive genealogy and local history subject index)

Genealogy Publishing Company (lots of family histories & county histories)

Google Books (lots of family histories & county histories)

Mayflower Society (especially the Silver Books)

National Archives (census, military, immigratin, land, tax, passenger records & much more)

New England Historic Society’s Collections at American Ancestors.org

New England Marriages Before 1700

More New England Marriages Before 1700

Newspapers.com($)

Pioneers of Massachusetts

The American Genealogist (Volumes 1 to 82 are available online to NEHGS members)

Ancestry.com. New England, The Great Migration and The Great Migration Begins, 1620-1635 [database on-line] The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England 2013; (also in book form) Original data: Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Volumes 1-3; The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volumes 1-6. Boston: New England Historical and Genealogical Society, 1996-2011.

The Great Migration Newsletter (Vols 1-20) also in book form.

Texas Colonial History

US Gen Web Project

The Winthrop Fleet Passengers List, 1630 (also in book form).

The Winthrop Fleet Passengers List, 1630 on Ancestry

Virtual Jamestowne

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