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May 20, 2022

These 14 States Had Significant Miscounts in the 2020 U.S. Census

To U.S. residents: were you counted in the 2020 Census?

According to an article written by Hansi Lo Wang and published in the NPR web site:

For the 2020 census, all states were not counted equally well for population numbers used to allocate political representation and federal funding over the next decade, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Thursday.

A follow-up survey the bureau conducted to measure the national tally’s accuracy found significant net undercount rates in six states: Arkansas (5.04%), Florida (3.48%), Illinois (1.97%), Mississippi (4.11%), Tennessee (4.78%) and Texas (1.92%).

It also uncovered significant net overcount rates in eight states — Delaware (5.45%), Hawaii (6.79%), Massachusetts (2.24%), Minnesota (3.84%), New York (3.44%), Ohio (1.49%), Rhode Island (5.05%) and Utah (2.59%).

For the other 36 states, as well as Washington, D.C., the bureau did not find statistically significant net over- or undercount rates.

These revelations come after the population totals from a census beset by the coronavirus pandemic and years of interference from former President Donald Trump’s administration have already been used to divvy up seats in the House of Representatives, as well as votes in the Electoral College, for the next decade.

“No census is perfect,” Census Bureau Director Robert Santos warned during a public webinar about the latest results from Post-Enumeration Survey. “And the PES allows us to become more informed about the 2020 census by estimating what portion of the population was correctly counted, where we missed people and where some people were counted that shouldn’t have been.”

You can read the entire article at: https://n.pr/3Mx1DkT.